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Vorschlag B

Aufgaben
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Ethnic identity

1.
Outline the role of religion in Amir’s family as presented in the extracts. (Material 3)
2.
Relate Amir’s problems with his ethnic origins to those of ethnic minorities living in the UK referring to material dealt with in class.
3.
In his New York Times Magazine article “Is cultural appropriation always wrong?” from 2015, Parul Sehgal questions the outcries concerning cultural appropriation (which is the adoption or use of elements of one culture by members of a different culture) in recent months, e.g. the casting of the blonde Emma Stone as the part-Chinese Hawaiian heroine in the film “Aloha”, Miley Cyrus hosting the Video Music Awards in dreadlocks and thus being accused of essentially performing in blackface, white poet Michael Derrick Hudson publishing under a Chinese pseudonym.
Assess whether cultural appropriation is generally reprehensible.
#ethnicidentity
Material 3
$\;$
Ayad Akhtar: Disgraced (extracts from the drama, 2013)
Extract 1:
Amir, a New York corporate lawyer of South Asian origin, and his Caucasian wife Emily, a painter whose work focuses on the spiritual roots of the Muslim, are being visited by Amir’s nephew Hussein. Hussein has just changed his name to Abe Jensen as having an American sounding name makes his life easier. He asks Amir for his legal support, which he has already denied before.
Amir Why are we still talking about this? […] Your guy should have been more careful.
Abe Imam[1] Fareed didn’t do anything. Every church in the country collects money. It’s how they keep their doors open. We’re entitled, too. He’s running a mosque –
Emily He’s got the right. Just because they’re collecting money doesn’t mean it’s for Hamas[2].
5
Amir What does any of this have to do with me?
Emily It doesn’t matter to you that an innocent man is in prison?
Amir I don’t know Patriot Act[3] law. The guy’s already got a legal team. Those guys Ken and Alex are amazing.
Abe They’re not Muslim.
10
Amir There we go.
Abe What?
Amir What I thought. I’m not gonna be part of a legal team just because your Imam is a bigot.
Abe He’s not a bigot. He’d just be more comfortable if there was a Muslim on the case, too …
Amir More comfortable if he wasn’t being represented by a couple of Jews?
15
Abe No. He liked you. He said you were a good man.
Amir Well, he might not feel the same if he knew how I really felt about his religion.
Abe That’s just a phase.
Amir Excuse me?
Abe That’s what Mom says Grandma used to say about you. That you were working something out. That
20
you were such a good Muslim when you were a kid. And that you had to go the other way for a while.
$\;$
Extract 2: Amir and Emily are having a dinner party with another couple – Isaac, a Jewish art curator[4] who is about to arrange an exhibition also displaying Emily’s art, and Jory, an African American working in Amir’s firm. Triggered by a discussion about one of Emily’s Islamic paintings, the conversation turns to different aspects of religion – and food – again and again.
Isaac Mmm. This is delicious, Em[ily]. Really.
Emily I picked up the recipe when I was on a Fulbright[5] in Seville.
Isaac I love Spain. I ran with the bulls in Pamplona.
Jory You did not run with the bulls.
25
Isaac I watched people run with the bulls.
Amir We went to Barcelona for our honeymoon. Gaudi[6]. The paella. The wine. Spanish wines are so underrated.
Isaac See, this is the problem I’m having … You’re saying Muslims are so different. You’re not that different. You have the same idea of the good life as I do. I wouldn’t have even known you were a Muslim if it wasn’t
30
for the article in the Times[7].
Pause.
Amir I’m not Muslim. I’m an apostate. Which means I’ve renounced my faith.
Isaac I know what the word apostate means.
Jory Isaac?
35
Amir Do you also know that – according to the Quran – it makes me punishable by death?
Emily That’s not true, Amir.
Amir Yes, it is.
Emily Have you even read that part? Have you? It condemns renouncing the faith, but it doesn’t specify punishment. The tradition has interpreted it as punishable by death.
40
Jory Impressive …
Emily He’s repeated it enough, I checked. I have a vested interest, after all.
The women laugh.
Amir Fine. So let’s talk about something that is in the text. Wife-beating.
Isaac Wife-beating?
45
Jory Great. Could you pass the bread?
Emily Amir, really?
Amir So the angel Gabriel comes to Muhammad …
Isaac Angel Gabriel?
Amir (mocking) Yeah. That’s how Muslims believe the Quran came to humanity. The angel Gabriel
50
supposedly dictated it to Muhammad word for word. […] ‘Men are in charge of women … ’
Emily Amir?
Amir ‘If they don’t obey … Talk to them. If that doesn’t work … Don’t sleep with them. And if that doesn’t work … ’
(Turning to Emily.) Em?
55
Emily I’m not doing this.
Amir ‘Beat them.’
Jory I don’t remember that being in the Quran.
Amir Oh, it’s there alright.
Emily The usual translation is debatable.
60
Amir Only for people who are trying to make Islam look all warm and fuzzy.
Emily The root verb can mean beat. But it can also mean leave. So it could be saying, if your wife doesn’t listen, leave her. Not beat her.
Isaac Sounds like a pretty big difference.
Amir That’s not how it’s been interpreted for hundreds of years.
65
[…] The Quran is about tribal life in a seventh-century desert, Isaac. The point isn’t just academic. There’s a result to believing that a book written about life in a specific society fifteen hundred years ago is the word of God: You start wanting to recreate that society. After all, it’s the only one in which the Quran makes any literal sense. That’s why you have people like the Taliban. They’re trying to recreate the world in the image of the one that’s in the Quran. […] And this is the real problem: It goes deeper than the Taliban. To be
70
Muslim – truly – means not only that you believe all this. It means you fight for it, too. […] And so, even if you’re one of those lapsed Muslims sipping your after-dinner scotch alongside your beautiful white American wife – and watching the news and seeing folks in the Middle East dying for values you were taught were purer – and stricter – and truer … you can’t help but feel just a little bit of pride.
Isaac Pride?
75
Amir Yes. Pride.
Isaac Did you feel pride on September 11[th]?
Amir If I’m honest, yes.
Emily You don’t really mean that, Amir.
Amir I was horrified by it, okay? Absolutely horrified.
80
Jory Pride about what? About the Towers coming down? About people getting killed?
Amir That we were finally winning.
Jory We?
Amir Yeah … I guess I forgot … which we I was.
Jory You’re an American …
85
Amir It’s tribal, Jor. It is in the bones. You have no idea how I was brought up. You have to work real hard to root that shit out.
Jory Well, you need to keep working.
Amir I am.
Ayad Akhtar: Disgraced, London 2013, S. 10 – 55.

Annotations
[1] Imam: the prayer leader of a Muslim mosque
[2] Hamas: Palestinian Islamic fundamentalist organization with focus on establishing an Islamic state in the area that is now Israel
[3] Patriot Act: an act of government signed into law after the 9/11 terrorist attacks to obstruct terrorism directed at the USA
[4] curator: somebody who is in charge of the exhibits in a museum
[5] Fulbright: American program that offers scholarships for and international exchanges between professionals
[6] Gaudi: Spanish architect
[7] Amir actually followed his nephew’s request and went to see the Imam. The Times wrongfully claimed Amir was the Imam’s legal support in an article about the trial.
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Ethnic identity

$\blacktriangleright$  1. Outline role of religion
  • Amir is Muslim, there is no mentioning of the religion of his wife Emily
  • Amir appreciates other religions (defends the Jewish lawyers of his nephews friends
  • reprimands Abe for saying that those lawyers are not Muslims
  • disagrees with bigotry
  • used to be a good Muslim when he was a child but lost his way
  • does not appear as a Muslim according to Isaac
  • even states that he is not a Muslim but an apostate and that he has renounced his faith although this is severably punishable according to the Quran
  • sees Islam as it really is, does not perceive it as warm and fuzzy as people do
  • for him, being truly Muslim means not only believing what is in the Quran, but fighting for it
  • people dying for the values makes Amir proud even though he has renounced his faith
  • even felt pride when Muslim fanatics hijacked airplanes and flew into the world trade center
  • feels confused about whether he belongs to Muslim faith or American indifference
  • always felt the urge "to work real hard to root that shit out" (l. 85-86) $\rightarrow$ feels that Muslim religion is somehow wrong but keeps going back to it
  • nephew Abe moderate Muslim (tries to help Imam)
  • Emily highly interested in every religion (paints pictures about religions), defends Islam against her husband
$\blacktriangleright$  2. Relate Amir's problems with ethnic origins to those of ethnic minorities living in UK
Amir's issue with his ethnic origin:
  • rejects the form of Islam that most Muslims practice
  • does not want to be seen as a Muslim
    $\rightarrow$ "if he knew how I really felt about his religion" (l. 16): Islam not his religion but that of others
  • not easy to unlearn upbringing or socialisation
  • used to be a good Muslim but it was just natural that he had to go the other way for a while according to his grandmother
  • however, he got stuck with the other way and considers Islam as "shit" that he still needs to root out of his mind (l. 85-86)
  • in hindsight, he sees Islam for what it is now to him and deems that as utterly wrong (wife-beating, killing innocents)
  • despises the fact that perceptions of Islam are clouded with warmth and fuzziness (l. 60) although that is not true
  • imagines himself in a Western context (sipping Scotch with American wife) but is always drawn back to religion (feeling proud of attacks on 9/11) (l. 71-73)
Miriam's issue with her ethnic origin ("A Pair of Jeans" by Qaisra Shahraz):
  • theme: conflict between first and second generation Asian immigrants to Britain
  • Miriam - the protagonist - is caught between Asian and Western values and traditions
  • has adapted Western lifestyle (studies at university, goes out with friends, wears Western clothes), is engaged with Farook whose parents once see Miriam in Western clothes and then decide to break off the engagement
  • Miriam is angry at that whereas her mother seems to accept the decision
  • two endings: Miriam accepts decision of Farook's parents and thus rejects Western style clothes and system of values // Miriam takes things in her own hands and urges to tell Farook why his parents made that decision and suggests then that they should discuss the matter with his parents
  • sees the benefits that Western culture entails (choice of clothes, being free as a woman, not having to obey to certain cultural codes)
  • has been brought up in Western European tradition (recognizes women as equals of men), parents allow her to dress as she likes
  • cannot deal with her own dishonesty (change between traditional Muslim clothes and Western clothes)
  • adapts to her environment and situations (by changing clothes)
  • parents more conservative, but open-minded (do not prohibit Miriam's style of clothing)
Parvez's issue with his ethnic origin ("My Son the Fanatic" by Hanif Kureishi):
  • has tried to assimilate into British society
  • loves England for its liberalism
  • no identity problems: brought up as Muslim, finds Western culture liberating
  • accepts other people for what they are without judging them
  • not at all religious
  • excessive drinking
  • fanatic in his defence of Western values
  • unable to tolerate Ali's rejection of the culture which he himself loves so much
  • son Ali rejects Western society and turns to religious fundamentalism in an attempt to find his identity
Comparison:
  • religion hinders all of them of being who they truly are
  • search for identity, have struggles with completely assimilating to Western culture (except for Parvez)
  • Miriam can be placed inbetween Parvez and Amir
  • Amir felt pride when attacks on 9/11 happened (still attached to his religion), Parvez doesn't care at all about religion
  • both Parvez and Amir grew up in religious surrounding and are first-generation immigrants, whereas Miriam grew up within a Western context and is a second-generation immigrant
$\blacktriangleright$  3. Assess whether cultural appropriation is reprehensible
Possible information for Introduction:
  • in times of globalization, it is natural that cultures get mixed together
  • cultural appropriation as adoption of certain elements from another culture without the consent of people who belong to that culture
  • controversial topic
  • typically involves members of a dominant group exploiting the culture of less privileged groups
Main Part - Reprehensibility of cultural appropriation
Pro arguments:
  • everyday life objects : everything we consume or wear has a somehow cultural connotation
    $\rightarrow$ that's how the West got democratic discourse, mathematics, and the calendar
  • maintenance of objects: most popular blue jeans in the U.S.
    $\rightarrow$ Japanese designers have preserved "heritage" American workwear
  • as long as nothing is being damaged, ridiculed or mocked
  • nothing can be generalized $\rightarrow$ if everyone would only live in their own culture, only whites could use the Internet because they invented it, only African-American people could listen to gospel songs…
Con arguments:
  • Emma Stone: "White washing" in Hollywood is not okay since the respective culture should be represented
    $\rightarrow$ in case of portraying a foreign character through a white actor: cultures do not feel they are taken seriously, white culture as being superior
  • exploitation: robs minority groups of the credit they deserve
    $\rightarrow$ art and music forms from minority groups are associated with members of the dominant group
    $\rightarrow$ dominant group is deemed innovative and edgy
    $\rightarrow$ minority that was borrowed from faces negative stereotypes that imply they’re lacking intelligence and creativity
  • trivialization: of violent historic oppression for instance
    $\rightarrow$ Washington redskins: term "redskin" $\rightarrow$ back then white people got paid when they killed Native Americans (brought the redskin as proof)
    $\rightarrow$ NFL insists on celebrating the genocide of a people for fun and profit
  • white people enjoy practices that ancestors were penalized for: commercialization of yoga
    $\rightarrow$ eventually eradicating the true practice
    $\rightarrow$ removing a culturally significant source of wellness and spirituality
  • not completely accepting the culture: people show love for the culture, but remain prejudiced against its people
    $\rightarrow$ ask for authentic Mexican food without the sketchy neighborhoods
Possible Conclusion:
  • the question of whether it is a homage or an insult is the core problem
  • what one person perceives as a tribute, the other person will se as disrespectful
  • it's a fine line and one that must be carefully considered
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Vorschlag B

Ethnic identity

$\blacktriangleright$  1. Outline role of religion
The extracts of Ayad Akhtar's drama "Disgraced" from 2013, focus on the conversations between a Muslim lawyer, his Caucasian wife and his nephew as well as a dinner party hosted by the lawyer and his wife for a couple they're friends with. Mainly, the sociopolitical themes revolve around self-identity of Muslim-American citizens.
Amir, the lawyer, is a Muslim. However, he has renounced his faith. His wife Emily's religion is not mentioned. Yet, she is highly interested in every religion as she paints pictures about the religions and as she defends the Islam against her husband later on in the play. Amir also appreciates other religions - he defends the Jewish lawyers of his nephew's friend. He even reprimands his nephew Abe for saying that hose lawyers are not Muslims and makes it clear that he disagrees with his nephew's bigotry. However, he once used to be a good Muslim when he was a child but he had lost his way. He also does not appear as Muslim according to Isaac, one of the dinner guests. Amir even states that he is not a Muslim but an apostate and that he has renounced his faith although this is severely punishable according to the Quarn. In fact, he sees the Islam as it really is and does not perceive it as warm and fuzzy as other people do. For him, being truly Muslim means not only believing what is written in the Quran but actually fighting for it. That people are dying for the values makes Amir proud even though he has renounced his faith. He even felt pride when Muslim fanatics hijacked airplanes and flew into the World Trade Center. Amir is actually very confused about whether he belongs to the Muslim faith (because you can never really get rid of your religion) or whether he feels more connected to the American indifference. That this is the case shows his urge "to work real hard to root that shit out" (ll. 85f.). Hence, he feels that the Muslim religion is wrong but he still keeps going back to it. His nephew Abe is a rather moderate Muslim - he has actually changed his name because it is easier not being associated with Muslims or Islam , yet, he helps his friend the Imam.
Vorschlag B $\blacktriangleright$  2. Relate Amir's problems with ethnic origins to those of ethnic minorities living in UK
Amir faces some serious identity crisis regarding his religious alignment. Yet, he is not the only immigrant or second-generation immigrant who had to deal with problems relating his ethnic origin. Many other ethnic minorities living in the UK have the same problems.
Amir rejects the form of Islam that most Muslims practice: he clearly doesn't want to be seen as a Muslim. The statement "Well, [the Imam] might not feel the same if the he knew how [Amir] really felt about his religion" (l. 16) makes this pretty clear. The Islam is not Amir's religion but that of others. It is also not easy for Amir to unlearn his upbringing or how he had been socialized. He used to be a good Muslim apparently, but it was just natural that he had to go the other way for a while according to his grandmother. However, he got stuck with the that other way and considers the Islam "shit" that he still needs to root out of his mind (ll. 85f.). In hindsight, Amir sees the Islam for what it is now and deems it utterly wrong - including the doctrines it spreads like beating your wife or killing innocents. The protagonist also despises the fact that perceptions of the Islam are clouded with warmth and fuzziness (l. 60) although that is not true. Consequently, he imagines himself in a Western context - sipping Scotch with his American wife - but is always drawn back to his original religion and thus feels somehow proud of the attacks on 9/11 (ll. 71f.).
Miriam, the main character in Qaisra Shahraz' short story "A Pair of Jeans" also faces an ethnic conflict, yet on another level. The short story mainly focuses on the conflict between the first and second generation Asian immigrants in Britain. Miriam is caught between Asian and Western values and traditions. She has actually adapted the Western lifestyle including studying at the university and wearing Western clothes. Yet, her future parents-in-law break off the engagement between Miriam and their son Farook when they see Miriam wearing Western clothes. Miriam is angry at that whereas her mother seems to accept the decision. Miriam definitely sees the benefits that Western culture entails like the choice of clothes, moving around freely as a woman or not having to obey to certain cultural codes. She has been brought up in the Western European tradition in which she recognizes women as equals of men and in which her parents allow her to dress as she likes. However, she cannot deal with her own dishonesty which manifests in the change between traditional Muslim clothes and Western clothes. By doing so, she adapts to her environment and to certain situations. Thus, she thinks that she won't be accepted by her parents-in-law in Western clothes and can't really fully commit to a Western lifestyle. So she feels constantly twisted between the Western and the traditional lifestyle.
The protagonist Parvez from Hanif Kureishi's short story "My Son the Fanatic" deals with similar problems. He has tried very hard to assimilate into British society and loves England for its liberalism. Parvez does not have identity problems - although he was brought up as a Muslim, he finds the Western culture liberating. He also accepts other people for what they are without judging them. He is not at all religious: he loses himself in excessive drinking and often visits a prostitute although he is married. Also, he is very fanatic in his defence of Western values. In addition, he is unable to tolerate his son Ali's rejection of the culture which he himself loves so much. Ali rejects the Western society and turns to religious fundamentalism in an attempt to find his identity.
When comparing Amir, Miriam and Parvez it becomes pretty obvious that religion hinders all of them from being who they truly are. They all search for their identity and have struggles with completely assimilating to Western culture, except for Parvez. Miriam can be placed inbetween Parvez and Amir - Amir felt pride when the attacks on 9/11 happened meaning he is still somewhat attached to his religion, whereas Parvez doesn't care at all about religion. In addition, both Parvez and Amir grew up in a religious surrounding and they are both first-generation immigrants. Miriam grew up within a Western context and is a second-generation immigrant. So they all deal differently with the problem of their origin - Parvez tries to forget by drinking alcohol and having sex, Miriam can't really decide which culture she belongs to and Amir actively tries to root his origin out of his system.
#apairofjeans#hanifkureishi
Vorschlag B $\blacktriangleright$  3. Assess whether cultural appropriation is reprehensible
In times of globalization, it is natural that cultures get mixed together. Words are being borrowed from other languages, different types of cuisines can be found all over the world and travelling to any place is very easy nowadays. Adopting certain elements from another culture without the consent of people who belong to that culture is called cultural appropriation. It typically involves members of a dominant group exploiting the culture of less privileged groups. This is a very controversial topic.
On the one hand, literally everything we do, consume or wear has a somewhat cultural connotation - I am thinking about the Chinese food we love or going to belly-dancing classes or wearing dreadlocks. This is also how the Western world got democratic discourse (from the Greek nation), mathematics (from various countries f.ex. Egypt, India and Greece) and the calendar (also from Egypt). So if we don't borrow anything from other cultures, we all would not have evolved to the nations we are now. Through cultural appropriation, objects which would actually have been forgotten were maintained. The most popular example should be the blue jeans that American workers used to wear. If Japanese designers wouldn't have preserved this piece of clothing, it might have probably been gone by now. In general, one could say that as long as nothing is being damaged, ridiculed or mocked, cultural appropriation is not reprehensible. In addition, nothing can be generalized. If everyone would live just in their own culture, no inventions from other cultures should be allowed to transgress into the own culture. Hence, only whites could use the Internet because they invented it, only African-American people would be allowed to use syringes and so on. No one would gain anything from that.
On the other hand, other cultures might abuse the concept of cultural appropriation in order to enforce their very own interests. One example of this is white washing in Hollywood. This means that a foreign character is represented by a White actor or actress just as Emma Stone represented an Asian character in a movie. That way the cultures do not feel that they are taken seriously and such behaviour suggests that the white culture is being superiour over others. Also, cultural appropriation robs minority groups of the credit that they actually deserve. Art and music forms from minority groups are rather associated with members of the dominant group. This dominant group then is deemed innovative and edge whereas the minority that was borrowed from faces negative stereotypes that imply they're lacking intelligence and creativity. Furthermore, cultural appropriation sometimes entails the trivialization of violent historic oppression for instance. Take the Washington redskins as an example. The term redskin belongs to a time when white people got paid when they killed Native Americans and brought the redskins as proof of their action. Thus, the NFL insists on celebrating the genocide of a people for fun and profit. And finally, a lot of people show love for a certain culture but still remain prejudiced against its people. For instance they might ask for authentic Mexican food but they don't want to visit a real Mexican restaurant in a sketchy neighbourhood.
The question of whether the cultural appropriation of whether it is a homage or an insult is a core problem. What one person perceives as a tribute, another person will see as disrespectful. No matter what, it's a fine line and it is one that must be carefully considered.
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