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Aufgabe 1

Aufgaben
Download als Dokument:PDF

Part 1: Canada - A Land of Many Nations

$\blacktriangleright\;$ Thema:
Joseph Boyden, Through Black Spruce, Published by Viking Canada, 2009
#novel
$\blacktriangleright\;$ Aufgabenstellung:
1.
Outline Will Bird's childhood memories of the trip from Moose Factory to the school.
#outline
2.
Analyse how the author portrays the impact Residential Schools had on the First Nations.
#analysis
3.
You are a guest student at James Bay Lowlands Secondary School in Ontario, Canada. In your social studies textbook you found the following question:
"The happiest future for the Indian race is absorption into the general population, and this is the object of the policy of our government. The great forces of intermarriage and education will finally overcome the lingering traces of native custom and tradition."
(Duncan Campbell Scott, Deputy Superintendent of native Affairs from 1913 till 1932)
This quotation provokes you to write a blog entry for your school's website on the cruelties of the past and their impact on present-day Canadian life.
Write the blog entry including their background knowledge.
#quotation#blogentry

Joseph Boyden, Through Black Spruce

 
Introductory Note: In Joseph Boyden's novel Will Bird, a Cree Bush Pilot, aged 55, is lying in hospital in his hometown of Moose Factory, Ontario and is visited by his niece. In his mind he relives many stations of his life. The following is one of them.
1
[…] In September of my fith year, my mother and father walked me to the school for the first time. We lived in Moose Factory then, in a little cabin in the woods on the middle of the island. Your mother was a tiny baby strapped in a tikanagan1 on my mother's back. My parents didn't tell me where we were going. My father carried a
5
hide pack with some of my clothes tucked inside. My father held my hand, something he rarely did. When I looked up at my mother, I saw tears on her cheeks.
"Where are we going, Papa?" I asked in Cree. He looked down the road. As we came near it, the big white building grew out of the stretch of trees near the river. I knew what it was. I'd stood in the woods nearby and watched the children, older
10
than me, playing and fighting in the fenced-in yard around it. We'd never spoken of the school, and I thought I was safe from what happenend to the other poor kids. My parents were somehow better that other parents. They didn't need to send me to such a place.
My mind went as white as that building then, and I thought I was going to throw up. I
15
pulled against my father's hand so that we could turn around and run if we had to. Some horrendous mistake had been made. "Mona2," is all I could say.
"No." My mother made a sound like she was gagging3, and my father stopped walking.
"We have to," my father said. "You know what will happen if we don't." I wasn't quite
20
sure if he was speaking to my mother or to me.
"We can leave this place, then," my mother said. "Go somewhere where they won't find us." "They will find us. There's nowhere to go anymore," my father said. "I am a one-legged old man. We can no longer live in the bush." He pulled my hand then, squeezed it hard, brought me crying uncontrollably to the gate where a man in black
25
clothes stood waiting with his hands behind him. Just the two of us came to the gate. I looked around for my mother. She'd stayed behind on the path, stood crouched as if her stomach was hugging herself. I looked up at my father. His eyes were wet, and he wouldn't look at me. "Mona, Nootahwe4 No, Father."
"They will take care of you. And I will visit when I'm allowed." My father seemed a
30
different person than the one I had known. He leaned to me. "lt will not be forever. Only for now." He hugged me, and l felt his thin back through his rough shirt. His body shivered. I knew he lied.
"lt will be easier for the boy if you leave now," the man in black said. He was a wemestikushu 5, white as a pickerel's6 belly. His Cree words surprised me. My father
35
didn't seem to hear him. "It is time," the man said, taking my arm. I wanted to bite his hand and scratch his eyes out. Then we could leave. "Four months will pass quickly. You'll see." The man's hand tightened on my arm. His nails dug in through my jacket. "Ashtum7 Come."
My father released me, and I screamed. "Mona! Mona!" The man in black clothes
40
took me then, and I watched my father recede as if through a window smeared with rain, only realizing it was me who was moving away as I was dragged through the school doors.
My father disappeared from me with such suddenness that it was physically violent. I threw up on the priest's black pants. He bent as if to comfort me but instead took my
45
face hard into his thin hands and shook me so that my neck muscles felt torn. "You are with God now," he said, his neck reddening, and his eyes round, "and with me. Christ's little soldiers are not crybabies." He dragged me by the hair to a room with a sink. He wet a towel in a bucket of water, and he made me kneel and clean his pants until no sign was left on them. […]
(809 words)
Joseph Boyden: Through Black Spruce.
Published by Viking Canada, 2009.
1     tikanagan: (word from the Cree language) cradle, baby sling
2     mona: (Cree) no
3     to gag: to choke, to suffocate
4     nootahwe: (Cree) white man
5     wemestikushu (Cree) white man
6     pickerel: dt.: junger Hecht
7     ashhtum: (Cree) come here
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Download als Dokument:PDF

Canada - A Land of Many Nations

$\blacktriangleright\;$ Thema:
Joseph Boyden, Through Black Spruce, Published by Viking Canada, 2009
$\blacktriangleright\;$ Aufgabenstellung:
1.
Outline Will Bird's childhood memories of the trip from Moose Factory to the school.
Bei dieser Aufgabe geht es darum, dass du den Textausschnitt zusammenfasst im Hinblick auf Will Bird's Kindheitserinnerung.
Bei einer Summary solltest du dich kurz fassen - verliere dich also nicht in Details.
Stell dir also die Frage: Was sind die wichtigsten Punkte und Ereignisse? Ebenso ist es wichtig, dass du deine eigenen Formulierungen verwendest und nicht zitierst. Lies dir den Text mehrmals genau durch. Nur wenn du den Text gut verstanden hast, kannst du eine gute Summary schreiben. Unterstreiche wichtige Keywords und versuche den Text in Abschnitte einzuteilen.
2.
Analyse how the author portrays the impact Residential Schools had on the First Nations.
Bei dieser Aufgabe geht es darum, dass du den Textausschnitt analysierst. Lies dir den Ausschnitt also nochmals durch und filtere heraus, welchen Einfluss die Residential Schools auf die Charaktere des Textauszugs haben. Zitiere dabei immer aus dem Text. Für deine Argumentationsführung kannst du verwendete Stilmittel analysieren.
3.
You are a guest student at James Bay Lowlands Secondary School in Ontario, Canada. In your social studies textbook you found the following question:
"The happiest future for the Indian race is absorption into the general population, and this is the object of the policy of our government. The great forces of intermarriage and education will finally overcome the lingering traces of native custom and tradition."
(Duncan Campbell Scott, Deputy Superintendent of native Affairs from 1913 till 1932)
This quotation provokes you to write a blog entry for your school's website on the cruelties of the past and their impact on present-day Canadian life.
Write the blog entry including their background knowledge.
Bei dieser Aufgabe sollst du anhand eines vorgegebenen Zitats einen Blogeintrag erstellen.
Überlege dir erst, worüber du schreiben sollst. Nenne wichtige Fakten zu diesem Thema.
Denke daran, dass du für deinen Blogeintrag einen interessanten Titel benötigst!
Weiter lernen mit SchulLV-PLUS!
Jetzt freischalten
Infos zu SchulLV PLUS
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Lösungen
Download als Dokument:PDF

Canada - A Land of Many Nations

$\blacktriangleright\;$ Thema:
Boyden, Joseph, "Through Black Spruce" (Toronto 2009, pp 88-91)
$\blacktriangleright\;$ Aufgabenstellung:
1.
Outline Will Bird's childhood memories of the trip from Moose Factory to the school.
Tipp
Bei dieser Aufgabe geht es darum, dass du den Textausschnitt zusammenfasst im Hinblick auf Will Bird's Kindheitserinnerung.
Bei einer Summary solltest du dich kurz fassen - verliere dich also nicht in Details.
Stell dir also die Frage: Was sind die wichtigsten Punkte und Ereignisse? Ebenso ist es wichtig, dass du deine eigenen Formulierungen verwendest und nicht zitierst. Lies dir den Text mehrmals genau durch. Nur wenn du den Text gut verstanden hast, kannst du eine gute Summary schreiben. Unterstreiche wichtige Keywords und versuche den Text in Abschnitte einzuteilen.
Tipp
Bei dieser Aufgabe geht es darum, dass du den Textausschnitt zusammenfasst im Hinblick auf Will Bird's Kindheitserinnerung.
Bei einer Summary solltest du dich kurz fassen - verliere dich also nicht in Details.
Stell dir also die Frage: Was sind die wichtigsten Punkte und Ereignisse? Ebenso ist es wichtig, dass du deine eigenen Formulierungen verwendest und nicht zitierst. Lies dir den Text mehrmals genau durch. Nur wenn du den Text gut verstanden hast, kannst du eine gute Summary schreiben. Unterstreiche wichtige Keywords und versuche den Text in Abschnitte einzuteilen.
The exctract from Through Black Spruce by Joseph Boyden tells us how Will Bird's parents had to bring him to a christian residential school.
Einleitung
Autor, Titel, Thema
He was five years old and his sister still a baby. He remembers how his father carries a backpack with his clothes in it and and holds his hand. His mothers is crying.
Before, attending the school has never been a topic of conversation in the family. That is why he felt safe so far and pitied the other children who had to go there. The moment they reach a big building he knows that his parents are going to send him to that school. He is surprised, even though he had his suspicions because of the unusual behavior of his parents. He tries to fight against his parents decision. His mother suggests to run away but the father seems to be sure to have no other choice. Then, his father tries to comfort him an promises him visits. He shows his true emotions by shivering and having tears in his eyes and the boys knows that he lies.
Will is desperate and clings to his father. He cries and begs his father not to leave him there. A priest comes and tells them to leave the boy. Will dislikes him from the very beginning. Due to his desperation and panic he throws up at the man's clothes when being dragged away. The priest reacts in a cruel way. He shakes him violently and drags him by his hair. Then, he forces him to kneel down and clean his pants.
Hauptteil
#firstnations
2.
Analyse how the author portrays the impact Residential Schools had on the First Nations.

Tipp
Bei dieser Aufgabe geht es darum, dass du den Textausschnitt analysierst. Lies dir den Ausschnitt also nochmals durch und filtere heraus, welchen Einfluss die Residential Schools auf die Charaktere des Textauszugs haben. Zitiere dabei immer aus dem Text. Für deine Argumentationsführung kannst du verwendete Stilmittel analysieren.
Tipp
Bei dieser Aufgabe geht es darum, dass du den Textausschnitt analysierst. Lies dir den Ausschnitt also nochmals durch und filtere heraus, welchen Einfluss die Residential Schools auf die Charaktere des Textauszugs haben. Zitiere dabei immer aus dem Text. Für deine Argumentationsführung kannst du verwendete Stilmittel analysieren.
In Joseph Boyden's novel Through Black Spruce illustrates how traumatizing the effect of Residential Schools was for children and their parents.
Beginning in the 1880s,thousands of aboriginal children were torn from their families and sent to residential schools. At these boarding schools they were poorly fed and neglected when being ill. The buildings were badly constructed and often desrcibed as fire traps.
In total, seven generations of children were scared by physical, emotional and sometimes even sexual abuse in the schools, which often represented violent prisons. The objective were to remove and isolate children from the influence of their homes, families, traditions and culture and to assimilate them into the dominate Canadian culture.
Einleitung
Autor, Titel, Thema

Hintergrund Informationen
The extract from Boyden's novel starts with the neutral statement that Will is walked to the school for the first time by his parents (cf. Text, line 1-2). Although his parents behave suspiciously: His father holds his hand, which is "something he rarely did" (Text, line 5) and his mother is crying (cf. Text, line 6). With these suspicious signs suspence is created reaching its climax in the simile in line 14 when Will's mind "went as white as a building". Will wants to vomit when he realizes to what place his parents brought him (cf. Text, line 14). His mind going blank and his urge to vomit are clear signs that Will realized the truth. The statements of the following dialoge are beeing kept short. "No" is all Will is able to say (Text, line 17, cf. line 16, line 25-26). Later, Will even screams (cf. Text, line 37) and expressions like "crying uncontrollably" (Text, line 24), "[h]is eyes were wet" (Text, line 25) and "[h]is body shivered" (Text, line 29-30) illustrates that parents and children were involuntarily and cruelly seperated. Although, the parents did not want to give away their children, they had no choice. "They will find us. There's nowhere to go anymore," (Text, line 22) says Will's father alluding to the government and it's decision to raise aboriginal children in boarding schools.
Expressions like "[h]is nails dug in" (Text, line 35) and "as I was dragged through the school doors" (Text, line 39-40) emphasize the negative atmosphere of the scene and underlines that force was used when the children were removed from their parents.
Will realizes that his parents are not as powerfull and reliable as he always thought them to be. "My father seemed a different person than the one I had known" (Text, line 27-28). The image he had from his father is completely changed. Before, he pitied the other children who had to go to the boarding school and he was sure that his parents were better that the other parents (cf. Text, line 11-12). Realizing that his exasperate cries for his father have no effect at all are traumatizing for Will. After he cannot see his father any longer he throws up on the priest's clothes (cf. Text, line 42). Also, for him the incident is "physically violent" (Text, line 41). Will's trust in his parents is destroyed and he knows that his father is lying to him (cf. Text, line 30). In addition, his parents feel guilty, too, since his father avoids his son's gaze (cf. Text, line 25). His mother is speechless. The description of the way she feels losing her child to a boarding school is a very strong image: She "stood crouched as if her stomach was bad hugging herself" (Text, line 27). Loosing her child is is as physically painfull as the child not being able to see his parents anymore.
The way the priest is described adds to the very negative atmosphere of the text excerpt. There is "a man in black clothes [standing and] waiting with his hands behind him" (Text, line 24-25) and "white as a pickerel's belly" (Text, line 34). The description conveys an image of an awing and uncanny person evoking feelings of coldness. He cruel behavior towards Will underline the evokes image of a cold priest.
The school yard is "fenced in" (Text, line 10) which alludes to the cold and jail-like situation Will is trapped in. Although he has begged as much as he could, his parents could not help him and both parents and child have no choice and find themselves in a dead end.
Hauptteil




Stilmittel






Trennung der Familie



negative Atmosphäre






Trauma












Priester und Schule
The boy's removal is shown as an emotional turning point in his life. Most of the time, the reader is participating due to the use of direct speech and the detailed description of fealings. However, the first sentence (cf. Text, line 1) of the excerpt makes clear that the insights of a grown-up Will will follow, still feeling the traumatic impact of that day.
Erzählstil
The excerpt illustrates how forceful and cruel tearing up aboriginal families was. The reader can only guess what other cruelties will wait for Will, since the beginning is already very harsh and coldhearted.
Schluss
3.
You are a guest student at James Bay Lowlands Secondary School in Ontario, Canada. In your social studies textbook you found the following question:
"The happiest future for the Indian race is absorption into the general population, and this is the object of the policy of our government. The great forces of intermarriage and education will finally overcome the lingering traces of native custom and tradition."
(Duncan Campbell Scott, Deputy Superintendent of Native Affairs from 1913 till 1932)
This quotation provokes you to write a blog entry for your school's website on the cruelties of the past and their impact on present-day Canadian life.
Write the blog entry including their background knowledge.
Tipp
Bei dieser Aufgabe sollst du anhand eines vorgegebenen Zitats einen Blogeintrag erstellen.
Überlege dir erst, worüber du schreiben sollst. Nenne wichtige Fakten zu diesem Thema.
Denke daran, dass du für deinen Blogeintrag einen interessanten Titel benötigst!
Tipp
Bei dieser Aufgabe sollst du anhand eines vorgegebenen Zitats einen Blogeintrag erstellen.
Überlege dir erst, worüber du schreiben sollst. Nenne wichtige Fakten zu diesem Thema.
Denke daran, dass du für deinen Blogeintrag einen interessanten Titel benötigst!
The past is not forgotten


I am a German Student at James Bay and during my stay here in Canada I learned a lot about Canada's past I didn't know. What I realised is that every country has it's own dark past that stand in stark contrast to our modern conception of pluralism and freedom of speech and mind.
European settlers in Canada brought with them the assumption that their own civilization was the pinnacle of human achievement. They interpreted the socio-cultural differences between themselves and the Aboriginal peoples as proof that Canada’s first inhabitants were ignorant, savage, and—like children—in need of guidance.
Einleitung
Anfänge in Kanada
As a result, the Canadian government decided that the First Nation people had to live in reservations. There they were supposed to be cut off from their traditions and customs. They were driven into a life that was dominated by the government's rules and into a hopeless life due to unemployment and tight social welfare. This lead to alcoholism, bad health, depression and in numerous cases even suicide. This life without prospects forced many into a life of crime, too. The First nation people had been forced to take the wrong path.
Hauptteil
Duncan Campbell Scott's quote, the Deputy Superintendent of Native Affairs of Canada from 1913 to 1932 illustrated very clearly what the government believed back them. He predicts the "happiest future for the Indian race" if they "overcome the lingering traces of native custom and tradition". The goverment wanted to force the First Nation people to neglect their own culture so that they would take on the culture the government believed to be the only right one: the culture of the European settlers. The government felt the need to “civilize” the Aboriginal peoples because they thought that Aboriginal cultures and spiritual beliefs were inferior and unequal in general.
Education — a federal responsibility — became the primary means to this end. Thousends of children were forced to leave their families and send to Residential Schools. The native children were educated according to Western and Christian beliefs to eliminate all aspects of Aboriginal culture. Students had their hair cut short, they were dressed in uniforms, and their days were strictly regimented by timetables. Boys and girls were kept separate, and even siblings rarely interacted, further weakening family ties. The housing and living conditions were poorly leading often to many infections. The school's rules were strict and violations of these rules severely punished. Abuse at these schools was widespread: emotional and psychological abuse was constant and sexual abuse was also common.
Bezug zu Zitat









Residential Schools
All this not only meant the breaking up of family bonds, it also left many of these children deeply traumatized with feelings of inferiority. Also, it lead to a deeply troubled identity since they couldn't become really "white" and western nor could they be native like their families. Naturally, this had a lasting and negative impact on many of the victims who are still suffering from mental and physical health problems.
Ergebnis
Many years had to pass till the Canadian government realised their mistakes.
In the 1990, the a native tribe revolted and claimed their rights. As a result, the government of Canada created a Royal Commission to look into the state of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Many treaties with First Nations were signed to at least partly give them back their traditional lands. In 1998, the government made a Statement of Reconciliation – including an apology to those people who were sexually or physically abused while attending residential schools – and established the Aboriginal Healing Foundation.
In 2005, Justice Minister Irwin Cotler called the decision to house young Canadians in church-run residential schools the single most harmful, disgraceful and racist act in Canadian history and in 2008, the Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper officially apologised to the victims.
No longer oppression, but tolerance, compensation and pluralism are part of the new policy prevalent in Canada. Today, the culture, language and tradition of the First nations are valued and respected. However, the change is not fully completed. Indigenous people still suffer from disadvantages. In comparison to the rest of the Canadian population, there is still a low level of education, a high rate of unemployment, poverty, drug abuse and much more. But the change in thinking has begun and it can be seen as a first step. Nevertheless, there is still a long way to go until true equality is reached.
As a German Student, I was fascinated by the the many museums dedicated to the First Nations and school curses dealing with this topic. I learned a lot, and above all I learned to appreciate more our modern way of thinking which is coined by multiculturalism and freedom.
#opinion
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