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Aufgabe 3

Aufgaben
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Part 1: Ireland - A Country between Tradition and Modernity

$\blacktriangleright\;$ Thema:
Anne Dunlop, The Pineapple Tart, in: Poolbeg Press
#novel
$\blacktriangleright\;$ Aufgabenstellung:
1.
Sketch the different opinions of the Gordon family members concerning Helen's study plans.
2.
Examine how the author characterises Helen in this excerpt.
#examination
3.
As a former student of the University College Dublin (UCD) and an enthusiastic Dublin citizen, helen Gordon is invited to the Alumni Meeting 2015
For the special edition of the UCD Alumni Magazine she is asked to write an article entitled "Going to Dublin in the 1990s - challenges and opportunities".

Write the article including your background knowledge.
#writing#creativewriting

Anne Dunlop, The Pineapple Tart

 
Introductory Note: The following extract is taken from Anne Dunlop's novel The Pineapple Tart, which focuses on Helen Gordon and her four sisters who have grown up in County Derry, Northern Ireland. One day Helen and her elder sister, Laura, tell their parents that they have decided fo study in Dublin.
1
[…] There were slaps and tears when I announced my intention to study in Dublin.
"Dublin!" Daddy spat the word out as if it caused a bad taste in his mouth. "What would you want to live in that bastion of popery1 for?" He was furious when he heard that Laura his pet was going there too. All that irked him of course was the slagging
5
his Orange friends would give him and to such prejudice I paid little heed.
Laura didn't actually want to study in Dublin as she had heard that the drink was very expensive but she wasn't prepared to go to England without me.
"It wouldn't be the same," she pouted dismally when I informed her that my mind was made up about Dublin. "Why can't you make up your mind to go to England
10
instead? Everyone who went there from my class says it's a great place - we could be real cool trendy students." She pictured herself wearing black clothes and white make-up, dyeing her hair jet2 and doing drugs. And maybe studying "One Dimensional Man" or some other obscure arty course. I stuck to my guns. Dublin was 120 miles away and uncharted territory for Ulster Presbyterians. When I was in
15
primary school we had a drawing on the wall of Northern Ireland with blue surrounding it. I thought Northern Ireland was an island until I was twelve. There was less than no chance of us ever meeting a Presbyterian that we knew, as the percentage of Presbyterians in University College was probably point zero something. Anyway, if I was in Dublin I could discard the trendy student bit and
20
come back to Derryrose and be Helen again when I wanted. I could ride Romeo, our fat pony, and sleep with Henry3, and listen to the wind playing hide-and-seek in the orchard and watch the sun set in the picture window in the dining room. I could sit at the bedroom window and listen to daddy talking to himself in the yard below. I could gossip to Daisy and Sarah and Jennifer and fight with them over the stupid things
25
that sisters always fight about. Laura didn't understand any of this "sentimental drivel" as she called it because she never thought about anyone but herself but she recognised the determined Gordon streak in me when I said that my mind was made up about UCD4.
"You mad old eejit5," she would say, "Still I suppose there must be men and sex and
30
wild times in Dublin too."
Daddy also supposed there were men and sex and wild times in Dublin and took no chances. He correctly reasoned that our, rather Laura's, plans would have little chance of development in a Presbyterian hostel and proceeded to enrol us in one such place in the vicinity of the college.
35
The morning we were to leave I rose at six to cook us breakfast. Mummy and daddy had never been to the South before and were highly suspicious of the natives of the Republic. I had lurid visions of wild-haired women and loads of barefoot children; daddy was convinced the water was poisoned and that we would be stoned. […]
Daddy was convinced that the Morris6 - the same Morris of twenty-five years ago -
40
wasn't going to make it to Dublin and was hyperactive as he loaded our bags into the boot. Mummy wasn't allowed to assist but stood by oohing and aahing at the appropriate intervals to encourage him. A tornado wouldn't have blown Emily7 off the roof-rack of the car, but daddy said that you could never be too careful, a Catholic would steal the eye out of your head and come back for the lash. Emily bad
45
belonged to gran-gran and he accorded her heirloom status. Mummy and I tried the tension of the ropes holding her on and made impressed noises to please him. […]
Laura and I were to share a room in the Youth Hostel and we cried and cried when we saw it. Dismal and dusty were the two adjectives I chose, Laura's couldn't be printed. It was fortunate that neither of us noticed the dirt because I don't think that
50
the room was ever cleaned the entire time we were there. I know because I wrote "Helen G. lst Ag8" in the dust the first evening I arrived and it was still there the day we left. Mummy and daddy thought we were crying because they were leaving and kept saying things like:
"We are only a phone call away," or "Don't forget that mummy loves you." […]
(869 words)
Anne Dunlop, The Pineapple Tart,
in: Poolbeg Press, 1992
Annotations:
1 popery: (derog.) the Roman Catholic Church
2 jet: black
3 Henry: a dog sleeping at the foot of Helen's bed
4 UCD: University College Dublin
5 eejit: (Anglo-Irish sl.) idiot
6 Morris: Austin Morris, a once famous brand of car
7 Emily: a bicycle
8 Ag: (abbr.) August
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Download als Dokument:PDF

Ireland - A Country between Tradition and Modernity

$\blacktriangleright\;$ Thema:
Anne Dunlop, The Pineapple Tart, in: Poolbeg Press
$\blacktriangleright\;$ Aufgabenstellung:
1.
Sketch the different opinions of the Gordon family members concerning Helen's study plans.
Bei dieser Aufgabenstellung sollst du die verschiedenen Meinungen bezüglich Helens Studienpläne beschreiben.
Stelle dir also die Frage: Was sind die wichtigsten Punkte?
Ebenso ist es wichtig, dass du deine eigenen Formulierungen verwendest und nicht zitierst. Bleibe dabei aber dennoch nah am Text und lass deine Meinung nicht miteinfließen.
2.
Examine how the author characterises Helen in this excerpt.
Bei dieser Aufgabenstellung sollst du untersuchen, wie Helen dargestellt wird. Analysiere dafür ihren Charakter, ihr Verhalten und ihre Beziehung zu den anderen Charakteren, die im Textauszug vorgestellt werden.
Baue deinen Text strukturiert auf und vergiss dabei nicht deine Argumentation mit Zitaten zu belegen.
3.
As a former student of the University College Dublin (UCD) and an enthusiastic Dublin citizen, helen Gordon is invited to the Alumni Meeting 2015
For the special edition of the UCD Alumni Magazine she is asked to write an article entitled "Going to Dublin in the 1990s - challenges and opportunities".

Write the article including your background knowledge.
Bei dieser Aufgabenstellung sollst du einen Artikel über die Herausforderungen und Möglichkeiten der 1990er Jahre in Dublin schreiben. Dafür sollst du dich in die Rolle der Protagonistin des Textauszugs hineinversetzen. Vergiss dabei nicht Informationen zu Dublin miteinfließen zu lassen, die du bereits im Unterricht gelernt hast.
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Lösungen
Download als Dokument:PDF

Ireland - A Country between Tradition and Modernity

$\blacktriangleright\;$ Thema:
Anne Dunlop, The Pineapple Tart, in: Poolbeg Press
$\blacktriangleright\;$ Aufgabenstellung:
1.
Sketch the different opinions of the Gordon family members concerning Helen's study plans.

Tipp
Bei dieser Aufgabenstellung sollst du die verschiedenen Meinungen bezüglich Helens Studienpläne beschreiben.
Stelle dir also die Frage: Was sind die wichtigsten Punkte?
Ebenso ist es wichtig, dass du deine eigenen Formulierungen verwendest und nicht zitierst. Bleibe dabei aber dennoch nah am Text und lass deine Meinung nicht miteinfließen.
Tipp
Bei dieser Aufgabenstellung sollst du die verschiedenen Meinungen bezüglich Helens Studienpläne beschreiben.
Stelle dir also die Frage: Was sind die wichtigsten Punkte?
Ebenso ist es wichtig, dass du deine eigenen Formulierungen verwendest und nicht zitierst. Bleibe dabei aber dennoch nah am Text und lass deine Meinung nicht miteinfließen.
Presbyterian Helen Gordon is one of four sisters and lives in County Derry in Northern Ireland. She is the protagonist of Anne Dunlop's novel The Pineapple Tart and wants to study at the University College in Dublin.
Einleitung
As Dublin is only 120 miles away she can return home whenever she wants. Nevertheless, she can enjoy the freedom she needs and gain distance from the influence of the Ulster Presbyterians. Also, she wants to enjoy the interesting student's life.
Just like her sister Laura who not only aims for an interesting student's life but also for the wild one. Originally, she wanted to study in England, but since she wants to stay together with her sister she is ready to give up on her dream.
Her father is a member of the Protestant Orange Order and is shoked about Helen's and Laura's decision. He shows his disapproval in an emotional outbrake. He thinks that Dublin could be dangerous for his two daughters warning them about the men, the poisened water and his prejudices against Catholic Dublin. He and his wife are not only worried about their daughters. Their father is also worried about his Protestant friends disapproving his permission to let the girls study in Dublin.
Hauptteil
Helen


Laura



Vater



Mutter

Freunde des Vaters
2.
Examine how the author characterises Helen in this excerpt.

Tipp
Bei dieser Aufgabenstellung sollst du untersuchen, wie Helen dargestellt wird. Analysiere dafür ihren Charakter, ihr Verhalten und ihre Beziehung zu den anderen Charakteren, die im Textauszug vorgestellt werden.
Baue deinen Text strukturiert auf und vergiss dabei nicht deine Argumentation mit Zitaten zu belegen.
Tipp
Bei dieser Aufgabenstellung sollst du untersuchen, wie Helen dargestellt wird. Analysiere dafür ihren Charakter, ihr Verhalten und ihre Beziehung zu den anderen Charakteren, die im Textauszug vorgestellt werden.
Baue deinen Text strukturiert auf und vergiss dabei nicht deine Argumentation mit Zitaten zu belegen.
Helen Gordon, the protagonist of the extract from Anne Dunlop's novel The Pineapple Tart has just finished school in an Presbyterian area of County Derry in Northern Ireland.
Confidently, she announces that she will study in Dublin in spite of the protests by her family (Text, l. 1).
Einleitung
One of her sisters wants to join in her plans although she first tries to convince her otherwise (cf. Text, l. 9-11). Helen might be a little bit envious of her sister because she characterizes her as her father's "pet" (Text, l. 4). Nevertheless, she has a rather dominant and confident personality since she cannot be convinced by her sister to change her decision, because her "mind was made up about Dublin" (Text, l. 9).
Hauptteil
She "st[i]ck[s] to [her] guns" (Text, l. 13) inspite of the obstacles given by her parents and her sister. This shows that Helen is determined to see something new. She is open to new experiences and above all wants to be able to make her own decisions without being supervised by Presbyterians that might report to her parents as "[t]here was less than no chance of [them] ever meeting a Presbyterian that [they] knew, as the percentage of Presbyterians in University College was probably point zero something" (Text, l. 16-18). In addition, her sister characterizes her as having a "determined Gordon streak in [her]" (Text, l. 27). This shows that Helen may be quite stubborn and has a strong personality, which seems to be typical for her family.
starke Persönlichkeit
Helen sees her sister's motivation to "be real cool trendy students" (Text, l. 10-11) rather critically. She seems to look down on her sister's plans and implies that she will wear only black clothes, do drugs and attend obscure arty courses (cf. Text, l. 13). Helen herself wants to be more than some superficial girl that studies only to come closer to the other sex. "[M]en and sex and wild times in Dubin" (Text, l. 29-30) are unambiguously her sister's plans and not her own.
Pläne der Schwester
Despite Helen's wish to leave her home and go to Dublin for studies she clearly loves her family and wants to be near them. As a practical reason for choosing Dublin she states, that it is only 120 miles away and therefore she can visit whenever she wants (cf. Text, l. 13). Also, her home is the place where she can "be Helen again when [she] wanted" (Text, l. 20). Helen is a sensitive girl that wants to make new experiences in another town but doesn't want to break the bonds with her family. Her family and her home are her place of refuge.
Although, she says that she regularly fights with her sister (cf. Text, l. 24) she is a family person and shows strong bonds tied to her family.
Familie
Her sister Laura comments about her "sentimental drivel" (Text, l. 24) and doesn't understand her when she says that she will miss her pony and her dog (cf. Text, l. 20-21) and "listen to the wind playing hide-and-seek in the orchard and watch the sun set in the picture window in the dining room" (Text, l. 21-22). This shows that Helen is not only a sentimental, sensitive and maybe romantic girl, but also that she is not as mature as she presents herself in the excerpt. She still is the little girl that loves to spend time with her pony and take a nap with her dog.
Empfindsamkeit
When she says that she "thought Northern Ireland was an island until [she] was twelve" (Text, l. 16) she reveals about her family that they have never been to the South. Everything they know about the South is based on prejudices and educational gaps, which is caused by her family's background and the history of Northern Ireland. Only Helen is ready to overcome her prejudiced by studying there and distances herself from her father's suspicions "of the natives of the Republic" (Text, l. 36) and his conviction that "the water was poisoned and that [they] would be stoned" (Text, l. 38).
Vorurteile
The knowledge derived from the excerpt about Helen's character may be subjective since the story is written in the first person from her own perspective. She gives the reader a detailed point of view and presents herself as a mature young woman that knows what she wants and has steadfast morals in contrary to her sister (cf. Text, l. 10-13). Also, she presents herself as being open-mindend unlike her conservative parents (cf. Text, l. 5). At the same time, she is a sensitive and emotional girl, that already knows before leaving her home what she will miss the most. She is not as resolute as she states she is, as she and her sister start to cry when they see the room they are going to share (cf. Text, l. 47-48)
Schluss
3.
As a former student of the University College Dublin (UCD) and an enthusiastic Dublin citizen, Helen Gordon is invited to the Alumni Meeting 2015.
For the special edition of the UCD Alumni Magazine she is asked to write an article entitled "Going to Dublin in the 1990s - challenges and opportunities".

Write the article including your background knowledge.
Tipp
Bei dieser Aufgabenstellung sollst du einen Artikel über die Herausforderungen und Möglichkeiten der 1990er Jahre in Dublin schreiben. Dafür sollst du dich in die Rolle der Protagonistin des Textauszugs hineinversetzen. Vergiss dabei nicht Informationen zu Dublin miteinfließen zu lassen, die du bereits im Unterricht gelernt hast.
Tipp
Bei dieser Aufgabenstellung sollst du einen Artikel über die Herausforderungen und Möglichkeiten der 1990er Jahre in Dublin schreiben. Dafür sollst du dich in die Rolle der Protagonistin des Textauszugs hineinversetzen. Vergiss dabei nicht Informationen zu Dublin miteinfließen zu lassen, die du bereits im Unterricht gelernt hast.
Going to Dublin in the 1990s - challenges and opportunities

The 1990s were a period of unparalleled expansion in the Irish econmy. Those years were often linked to the roaring economic advances in the Asian Pacific by coining the phrase "Celtic Tiger". In revearsal of the situation that had existed for much of the twentieth century the unemployment rate sank significantly.
Einleitung
And there I was, a small-town country girl who had just finished school, ready for the student's life in Dublin. I had never been to the Republic before and back than I was preoccupied with my parent's prejudices. We were Ulster Presbyterians and my sister and I were practically fraternizing with the enemy.
Back then, the Good Friday Agreement was still to come, so it was understandable for my father to oppose our decision. The resolution to the war-like conflict between Northern Ireland and the Republic seemed to be far away, especially since from the 1970s onwards the outbrakes and violence was only escalating further. Espacially the 1980s left their mark on my father's opinion about the Republic. The 80s were the years when crime levels began to soar particularly in Dublin and drug abuse became an increasingly pressing issue. No wonder my father was worried to let his daugthers study in this particular city.
I decided to study with Laura in Dublin although she wanted to go to England. I payed no attention to her opposition. I knew, Dublin was the place to be despite everything. Very few people understood my decision. All I heard was: "why do you want to go to the Greens? Who would want to live in that bastion of popery?" But I wanted it so much, I wanted to see the city that was so close to use and yet seemed to be so far away. Finally, after several discussions with my parents, I arrived together with my sister in a Presbyterian Hostel. To stay at this place was the compromise made between our father and us. He wanted us to be safe from all those dangerous Dubliner men my sister wanted to meet and spend time with. But the Hostel turned out to be a dirty and shabby place. Nevertheless, it was an interesting starting point.
Hauptteil





Konflikt Nordirland und Republik Irland







Helens Entscheidung
To us it was clear that we needed a job to get away from this Presbyterian Hostel we didn't want to live in. Though I admit that in this case the problem wasn't the lack of cleanliness or that we could hear the other resident's voices carried through the thin walls of our room but rather that our new home was Presbyterian. Even though I wanted to discover uncharted territory for Ulster Presbyterians.
Luckily, that time was full of opportunities. Unemployment fell to 4 per cent. That was half the EU average! A huge number of new businesses were opening up or moving to Dublin's city centre. And here we were in the middle of an evolving metropolis.
Aufschwung
It wasn't that difficult to find a student's job. We earned our money and were able to look for our own little perfect flat. Fortunatly, we were quick and were able to find a reasonable and affordable place. Because the down-side that resulted from the numerous businesses that moved to Dublin was that the rents became more and more expensive. Therefore, the long-awaited economic growth drove many residents out of the city centre.
There was good potential for small businesses so during our studies my sister and I decided to have a bash at starting a new business. Since we were small children we were very creative and so we decided to open up a shop where we would sell our hand-made jewellery. The rent of our little shop was excessivly high but we worked hard and earned good money. Because of the high rent we decided to just buy the place and after only four years we were unmortgaged. The years that followed were good until 2008, when the economic bubble burst. Many businesses tumbled and our little shop had no chance of surviving. After three years we had to close it down for a time.














2008: Wirtschaftskrise
Now, I still live in Dublin. I simply cannot leave this heartwarming city that is still the city full of opportunities. Noone can say what the future holds for us but I see an upward economic trend. Businesses are coming back to town and soon we will open up our little shop again. That is what I learned during my studies at the University College in Dublin: it may be hard sometimes but we have our future in our hand.
Schluss
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