Inhalt
Smarter Learning!
Inhalt
Bundesland, Schulart & Klasse
Bundesland, Schulart & Klasse
BW, Gymnasium (G9)
Baden-Württemberg
Berufl. Gymnasium (AG)
Berufl. Gymnasium (BTG)
Berufl. Gymnasium (EG)
Berufl. Gymnasium (SGG)
Berufl. Gymnasium (TG)
Berufl. Gymnasium (WG)
Berufskolleg - FH
Gemeinschaftsschule
Gymnasium (G8)
Gymnasium (G9)
Hauptschule
Realschule
Werkrealschule
Bayern
Fachoberschule
Gymnasium
Mittelschule
Realschule
Berlin
Gymnasium
Integrierte Sekundarschule
Brandenburg
Gesamtschule
Gymnasium
Oberschule
Bremen
Gymnasium (G8)
Oberschule (G9)
Hamburg
Gymnasium
Stadtteilschule
Hessen
Berufl. Gymnasium
Gesamtschule
Gymnasium (G8)
Gymnasium (G9)
Haupt- und Realschule
Hauptschule
Realschule
Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
Gesamtschule
Gymnasium
Niedersachsen
Gymnasium (G8)
Gymnasium (G9)
Integrierte Gesamtschule
Kooperative Gesamtschule
Oberschule
Realschule
NRW
Gesamtschule
Gymnasium
Hauptschule
Realschule
Sekundarschule
Rheinland-Pfalz
Gesamtschule
Gymnasium
Saarland
Gemeinschaftsschule
Gesamtschule
Gymnasium
Realschule
Sachsen
Gymnasium
Oberschule
Sachsen-Anhalt
Fachgymnasium
Gesamtschule
Gymnasium
Sekundarschule
Schleswig-Holstein
Gemeinschaftsschule
Gymnasium (G8)
Gymnasium (G9)
Thüringen
Berufl. Gymnasium
Gemeinschaftsschule
Gesamtschule
Gymnasium
Regelschule
Klasse 13
Klasse 13
Klasse 12
Klasse 11
Klasse 10
Klasse 9
Klasse 8
Klasse 7
Klasse 6
Klasse 5
Fach & Lernbereich
Fachauswahl: Englisch
Mathe
Deutsch
Englisch
Bio
Chemie
Physik
Geschichte
Geo
Lernbereich
Lektürehilfen
Digitales Schulbuch
Abitur
Abitur
Abitur
Smarter Learning!
Schneller lernen mit deinem SchulLV-Zugang
  • Zugang zu über 1.000 Original-Prüfungsaufgaben mit Lösungen von 2004-2019
  • Alle Bundesländer und Schularten, empfohlen von über 2.300 Schulen in Deutschland
  • Digitales Schulbuch: Über 1.700 Themen mit Aufgaben und Lösungen
  • Monatlich kündbar, lerne solange du möchtest
Jetzt Zugang freischalten!
Inhaltsverzeichnis
Lernbereich Lektürehilfen
Übersicht
Brave New World
Introduction
Summaries
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4-6
Chapter 7-8
Chapter 9-10
Chapter 11-12
Chapter 13-15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17-18
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Setting
Context
Crooked Letter, Crook...
Summaries
Chapter 1 - 2
Chapter 3 - 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10 - 11
Chapter 12 - 13
Chapter 14 - 16
Chapter 17 - 19
Characters
Symbols and Symbolism
Themes and Motifs
Gran Torino
Introduction
Key Scenes
Characters
Storytelling
Setting
Themes and Motifs
Half Broke Horses
Summaries
Chapter I: Salt Draw
Chapter II: The Mirac...
Chapter III: Promises
Chapter IV: The Red S...
Chapter V: Lambs
Chapter VI: Teacher L...
Chapter VII: The Gard...
Chapter VIII: Gumshoe...
Chapter IX: The Flybo...
Epilogue: The Little ...
Family Structures
Main Characters
Lily Casey Smith
Adam Casey
Daisy Mae Casey
Helen Casey
Jim Smith
Rosemary Smith
Rex Walls
Secondary Characters
Buster Casey
Dorothy Casey
Mother Albertina
Ted Conover
Orville Stubbs
Jim Smith junior
Other Characters
Structure of the Nove...
Setting
Prüfungsaufgaben zur ...
L.A. Crash
Einleitung
Schlüsselszenen
Narrative Filmstruktu...
Setting
Fakten
Bevölkerungsstruktur
Kriminalität
Personen im Film
Hauptcharaktere
Officer John Ryan
Officer Tom Hansen
Cameron und Christine...
Rick und Jean Cabot
Anthony
Peter Waters
Graham Waters
Daniel Ruiz
Farhad
Nebencharaktere
Verflechtung der Haup...
Verflechtung der Haup...
Bedeutung des Titels
Themen und Motive
Rassismus
Vorurteile
Kriminalität
Isolation und Ausgren...
Dominanz
Religion
Einwanderung
Besiedelung des Weste...
9/11
Waffenrecht in den US...
Filmanalyse
Kameraführung
Licht
Musik
Prüfungsaufgaben zur ...
Macbeth
Introduction
Summaries
Act I
Act II
Act III
Act IV
Act V
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Context
Good To Know
Othello
Introduction
Summaries
Act I
Act II
Act III
Act IV
Act V
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Context
Romeo and Juliet
Introduction
Summaries
Act I
Act II
Act III
Act IV
Act V
Characters
Themes and Motifs
Setting
The Great Gatsby
Introduction
Summaries
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Context
Good To Know
To Kill a Mockingbird
Introduction
Summaries
Chapter 1
Chapters 2 - 3
Chapters 4 - 6
Chapters 7 - 8
Chapters 9 - 11
Chapters 12 - 13
Chapters 14 - 15
Chapters 16 - 17
Chapters 18 - 19
Chapters 20 - 22
Chapters 23 - 25
Chapters 26 - 27
Chapters 28 - 31
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Context

Themes and Motifs

Lektürehilfen
Download als Dokument:PDF

Themes and Motifs

Redemption
  • Walt's confession to Father Janovich only focuses on minor offenses (betraying his wife, tax dodging)
  • really confesses his doings to Thao, not to Father Janovich
    $\rightarrow$ believes that only his Korean friend can absolve him
  • will remember the atrocities of Korean war and the deaths of soldiers he was responsible for untill he dies, claims that he can live with that
  • at Walt's funeral, Janovich explains that he learned a whole lot from Walt about life, death and sacrifice
  • Walt deems his life as not as important as Thao's
    $\rightarrow$ regrets things that happened in the past
    $\rightarrow$ has blood on his hands in comparison to Thao
    $\rightarrow$ Thao's soul is supposed to stay untainted
    $\rightarrow$ decides to sacrifice his life in order for Thao to remain unhaunted of nightmares/regrets
  • Walt's sacrifice might redeem the other sins he had made
    $\rightarrow$ lies on the floor with arms stretched like Jesus on the cross
    $\rightarrow$ Jesus sacrificed himself for humanity's sins
  • Walt regrets that he was never close to his family
    $\rightarrow$ at confession, he confesses that this has bothered him throughout his whole life
    $\rightarrow$ makes up for that by helping the Vang Lor family
    $\rightarrow$ acts for the purpose of Christianity by embodying benevolence and non-violence
The Human Ability to Change
  • movie celebrates the fact that everyone can change
  • some societal problems exist through narrow-mindedness and people being stuck in their ways and unwilling to explore something new
  • mostly highlighted in old people
    $\rightarrow$ Walt resisting to mow his lawn with an automatic lawn mower
  • people don't change just like that, they change due to the influence of other people or situations they have encountered
    $\rightarrow$ Walt changes through the influence of Thao and Sue
    $\rightarrow$ gets Thao a job, defends Sue
    $\rightarrow$ still racist when he refers to the Hmong gang members as "swamp rats" but protects his Hmong neighbours with his life
  • Walt's willingness to change might stem from the fact that he knows he is dying
    $\rightarrow$ wants to make up for what he has done wrong with his own sons
Conflicts Between Groups
  • difficulty of getting along for people of different types
    $\rightarrow$ lack of understanding causes conflicts
  • generational conflict: Walt lacks a deep understanding for his sons
    $\rightarrow$ might wonder why they have moved to the suburbs, why they sell Japanese cars
    $\rightarrow$ doesn't understand grandchildren either: pierced belly button, being disrespectful by playing with a mobile phone during a funeral…
    $\rightarrow$ doesn't understand the teenagers of the neighbourhood and why they joing gangs
  • lack of understanding is mutual: sons don't understand Walt as well
    $\rightarrow$ don't understand his choice of place
    $\rightarrow$ grandchildren can't understand why he doesn't share the Gran Torino
    $\rightarrow$ gang members think he is crazy, stand up to him by calling him an old man
  • racial conflict: communities become more and more diverse due to the globalized world, but Walt seems that he can't accept that
    $\rightarrow$ Walt is xenophobic, his fear towards foreigners is deeply rooted
    $\rightarrow$ calls them derogatory names ("Dragon lady", "swamp rats")
    $\rightarrow$ hatred might stem from his war duty
    $\rightarrow$ however, Walt learns that people are not defined by their race but by their actions
    $\rightarrow$ friendship to Thao and Sue changes his opinion, feels he has more in common with them than with his very own family
  • other conflicts: gang conflict between Blacks, Hispanics, Asians / old vs. new (American car vs. Japanese car)
The Nature of Masculinity
  • masculinity is not a firm construct, it is changeable
  • different forms of masculinity: Walt, his sons, Thao, the gang
  • becoming a man does not happen without outer influences (Thao needs guidance from Walt, Walt depends on Thao to fulfill his fatherly duties)
  • a man according to Walt: proactive, taking responsibility, patriarchal
    $\rightarrow$ Walt is a man (according to himself) because he is actively trying to make up for what he did during Korean war and for the badly planned move against the Hmong gang which ultimately resulted in Sue's rape and the attack of the Vang Lors
    $\rightarrow$ protector of the weak, authoritarian, intervenes at all costs (even armed with a gun) when no one else does
  • Walt's opinion towards masculinity changes throughout the movie
    $\rightarrow$ violence has been a result of fear, isolation and suffering
    $\rightarrow$ wants to spare Thao that same experience, prevents him from murdering Spider
  • Thao is rather submissive and is dominated by his sister, mother and grandmother, is doing girl chores
    $\rightarrow$ other male Hmong teenagers are part of gangs, are tough, mark their territory and intimidate weaker ones
  • traditional picture of masculinity matches the character of Walt
    $\rightarrow$ is a war veteran, used to work in a car factory, is handy, drinks beer and eats beef jerky, swears, banters with his mates
  • Walt is like a father-figure to Thao and a male role model according to Sue
    $\rightarrow$ Thao never had a father present to teach him the male ways
  • Walt functions as a substitute for the father-figure that Thao so desperately needs
    $\rightarrow$ teaches him handyman skills and how to talk manly, gets him a job on a construction site
    $\rightarrow$ on a deeper level, Thao is being taught to take responsibility for oneself, to treat women respectfully and that he is better than the gang members
    $\rightarrow$ Thao passes Walt's masculinity-test (repairs decayed houses in the neighbourhood for free, actively taking responsibility for the security of the people there)
  • Walt sees his two sons as the complete opposite of him, they are weak and are dominated by their wives, therefore, he is not at all interested in bonding with them
    $\rightarrow$ Mitch is too weak to tell his daughter to wear proper clothes to church and to behave adequately
  • the gang embodies masculinity through violence
    $\rightarrow$ disrespect women, have initiation rituals to prove masculinity (stealing the Gran Torino for instance)
    $\rightarrow$ hypermasculinity (non-ethical, non-human)
    $\rightarrow$ members of Hmong gang grew up without a father (due to Vietnam war), are not able to adapt due to that (in contrast to girls, as Sue explains)
  • Walt also considers the priest Father Janovich as a weak man
Racism
  • Walt feels that his neighbourhood changed from being inhabited by white middle-class workers to being inhabited by foreigners
  • Walt is being confronted with people who look differently, who speak an unintelligible language and who have different customs
  • strong aversion against Hmongs
    $\rightarrow$ does not want to communicate with them
    $\rightarrow$ American flag as stand-alone symbol of the last American bastion in the neighbourhood
    $\rightarrow$ demonstrates his utter hatred by being unwilling to lend Thao some cable and by using that exact cable in front of Thao's house
    $\rightarrow$ uses derogatory insults like "gook" or "swamp rats"
    $\rightarrow$ more than willing to use grave, misanthropic offenses like "You are nothing to me. In Korea, we stacked fucks like you five feet high and used you as sandbags."
    $\rightarrow$ racism is a sign of insecurity and inexperience with regard to Walt
    $\rightarrow$ doesn't know anything about the customs and traditions or the culture of the Hmong people
    $\rightarrow$ is convinced that stereotypes and prejudices apply to his neighbours
  • Walt slowly refrains from his prejudices
    $\rightarrow$ Sue is no longer a "gook" to him but the "dragon lady"
    $\rightarrow$ learns that Hmong have a lot in common with Americans (were allies of the American during Vietnam war)
    $\rightarrow$ sees the young soldier he killed in Thao, this is made clear to him by the Hmong shaman, not the Catholic priest
    $\rightarrow$ notices that the Hmong lifestyle (social, family values) align with his attitude towards family (not the consumption-oriented, careless family he has)
Weiter lernen mit SchulLV-PLUS!
Jetzt freischalten
Infos zu SchulLV PLUS
Ich habe bereits einen Zugang
Zugangscode einlösen
Login
Folge uns auf
SchulLV als App