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Inhaltsverzeichnis
Lernbereich Lektürehilfen
Übersicht
Brave New World
Introduction
Summaries
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4-6
Chapter 7-8
Chapter 9-10
Chapter 11-12
Chapter 13-15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17-18
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Setting
Context
Crooked Letter, Crook...
Summaries
Chapter 1 - 2
Chapter 3 - 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10 - 11
Chapter 12 - 13
Chapter 14 - 16
Chapter 17 - 19
Characters
Symbols and Symbolism
Themes and Motifs
Gran Torino
Introduction
Key Scenes
Characters
Storytelling
Setting
Themes and Motifs
Half Broke Horses
Summaries
Chapter I: Salt Draw
Chapter II: The Mirac...
Chapter III: Promises
Chapter IV: The Red S...
Chapter V: Lambs
Chapter VI: Teacher L...
Chapter VII: The Gard...
Chapter VIII: Gumshoe...
Chapter IX: The Flybo...
Epilogue: The Little ...
Family Structures
Main Characters
Lily Casey Smith
Adam Casey
Daisy Mae Casey
Helen Casey
Jim Smith
Rosemary Smith
Rex Walls
Secondary Characters
Buster Casey
Dorothy Casey
Mother Albertina
Ted Conover
Orville Stubbs
Jim Smith junior
Other Characters
Structure of the Nove...
Setting
Prüfungsaufgaben zur ...
L.A. Crash
Einleitung
Schlüsselszenen
Narrative Filmstruktu...
Setting
Fakten
Bevölkerungsstruktur
Kriminalität
Personen im Film
Hauptcharaktere
Officer John Ryan
Officer Tom Hansen
Cameron und Christine...
Rick und Jean Cabot
Anthony
Peter Waters
Graham Waters
Daniel Ruiz
Farhad
Nebencharaktere
Verflechtung der Haup...
Verflechtung der Haup...
Bedeutung des Titels
Themen und Motive
Rassismus
Vorurteile
Kriminalität
Isolation und Ausgren...
Dominanz
Religion
Einwanderung
Besiedelung des Weste...
9/11
Waffenrecht in den US...
Filmanalyse
Kameraführung
Licht
Musik
Prüfungsaufgaben zur ...
Macbeth
Introduction
Summaries
Act I
Act II
Act III
Act IV
Act V
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Context
Good To Know
Othello
Introduction
Summaries
Act I
Act II
Act III
Act IV
Act V
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Context
Romeo and Juliet
Introduction
Summaries
Act I
Act II
Act III
Act IV
Act V
Characters
Themes and Motifs
Setting
The Great Gatsby
Introduction
Summaries
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Context
Good To Know
To Kill a Mockingbird
Introduction
Summaries
Chapter 1
Chapters 2 - 3
Chapters 4 - 6
Chapters 7 - 8
Chapters 9 - 11
Chapters 12 - 13
Chapters 14 - 15
Chapters 16 - 17
Chapters 18 - 19
Chapters 20 - 22
Chapters 23 - 25
Chapters 26 - 27
Chapters 28 - 31
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Context

Symbols

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The Great Gatsby: Symbols

The Green Light

"Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter - tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning - So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." - Nick Carraway (Chapter 9, p. 115)
  • the green light is a permanently lit electric lamp that marks the end of Daisy and Tom’s boat dock
  • represents the abstract concepts of yearning and the American Dream, in fact to Gatsby, the green light represents his dream Daisy (attaining her equals to having completed the American Dream)
  • in Chapter 1 he reaches toward it in the darkness reminscing of a guiding light to lead him towards his goal
  • it is described as minute and far away which makes it impossible to reach
  • green light also represents the hazy future as seen in the last chapter as well as the way that the United States must have look to early settlers (Chapter 9)

The Eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg

"But above the gray land and the spasms of bleak dust which drift endlessly over it, you perceive, after a moment, the eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg. […] But his eyes, dimmed a little by many paintless days, under sun and rain, brood on over the solemn dumping ground." - Nick Carraway (Chapter 2, page 16)
  • fading eyes with glasses painted on an advertising billboard in the Valley of Ashes
  • although the novel does not mention this explicitly, the eyes might represent God who stares down upon the American society as some kind of moral wasteland and judges it, thus symbolizing the loss of spiritual values in America
  • also symbolize the corruption of America’s people
    • stare down on the main characters as they pass underneath the Valley of Ashes on their way into New York City
    • Tom meets his affair Myrtle Wilson, Gatsby introduces Nick to Meyer Wolfsheim
    • Daisy visits the city with her lover Gatsby

The Valley of Ashes

"This is a valley of ashes — a fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens; where ashes take the forms of houses and chimneys and rising smoke and, finally, with a transcendent effort, of men who move dimly and already crumbling through the powdery air." - Nick Carraway (Chapter 2, p. 16)
  • represents absolute poverty and hopelessness, also represents the moral and social decay hidden by the West, and East Egg
  • illustrates how the American Dream is impossible to achieve for those who are less fortunate than Tom Buchanan
    • Myrtle - in her attempt to escape poverty and working-class life with Wilson - starts an affair with Tom in hopes to make it out of her misery, but she gets killed by Daisy and thus, her dream has never come true
  • confrontation of Tom and George over the selling of Tom's car shows how the rich look down on the poor because of the difference in their social status
  • valley was created through industrial dumping and is hence considered a by-product of capitalism

Gatsby's mansion

"A factual imitation of some Hotel de Ville in Normandy, with a tower on one side, spanking new under a thin beard of raw ivy, and a marble swimming pool, and more than forty acres of lawn." - Nick Carraway (Chapter 1, page 5)
  • the mansion symbolizes the grandness as well as the emptiness of the roaring 20s since Gatsby is living alone in it, yet invites a trmendous amount of people to his parties every weekend
  • it is also a symbol for Gatsby's love for Daisy $\rightarrow$ Gatsby used his money made from bootlegging in order to buy and create a place that is better than the houses of people who come from old money (and who had taken Daisy away from Gatsby)
  • the house doesn't represent Gatsby's personality but his belief that in order to get Daisy back, he must reinvent himself
    • he has never read the books in his library but wanted to create the appearance of intelligence
Aus: F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby, Wordsworth Classics, 1993, London
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