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Inhaltsverzeichnis
Lernbereich Lektürehilfen
Übersicht
Brave New World
Introduction
Summaries
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4-6
Chapter 7-8
Chapter 9-10
Chapter 11-12
Chapter 13-15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17-18
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Setting
Context
Crooked Letter, Crook...
Summaries
Chapter 1 - 2
Chapter 3 - 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10 - 11
Chapter 12 - 13
Chapter 14 - 16
Chapter 17 - 19
Characters
Symbols and Symbolism
Themes and Motifs
Gran Torino
Introduction
Key Scenes
Characters
Storytelling
Setting
Themes and Motifs
Half Broke Horses
Summaries
Chapter I: Salt Draw
Chapter II: The Mirac...
Chapter III: Promises
Chapter IV: The Red S...
Chapter V: Lambs
Chapter VI: Teacher L...
Chapter VII: The Gard...
Chapter VIII: Gumshoe...
Chapter IX: The Flybo...
Epilogue: The Little ...
Family Structures
Main Characters
Lily Casey Smith
Adam Casey
Daisy Mae Casey
Helen Casey
Jim Smith
Rosemary Smith
Rex Walls
Secondary Characters
Buster Casey
Dorothy Casey
Mother Albertina
Ted Conover
Orville Stubbs
Jim Smith junior
Other Characters
Structure of the Nove...
Setting
Prüfungsaufgaben zur ...
L.A. Crash
Einleitung
Schlüsselszenen
Narrative Filmstruktu...
Setting
Fakten
Bevölkerungsstruktur
Kriminalität
Personen im Film
Hauptcharaktere
Officer John Ryan
Officer Tom Hansen
Cameron und Christine...
Rick und Jean Cabot
Anthony
Peter Waters
Graham Waters
Daniel Ruiz
Farhad
Nebencharaktere
Verflechtung der Haup...
Verflechtung der Haup...
Bedeutung des Titels
Themen und Motive
Rassismus
Vorurteile
Kriminalität
Isolation und Ausgren...
Dominanz
Religion
Einwanderung
Besiedelung des Weste...
9/11
Waffenrecht in den US...
Filmanalyse
Kameraführung
Licht
Musik
Prüfungsaufgaben zur ...
Macbeth
Introduction
Summaries
Act I
Act II
Act III
Act IV
Act V
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Context
Good To Know
Othello
Introduction
Summaries
Act I
Act II
Act III
Act IV
Act V
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Context
Romeo and Juliet
Introduction
Summaries
Act I
Act II
Act III
Act IV
Act V
Characters
Themes and Motifs
Setting
The Great Gatsby
Introduction
Summaries
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Context
Good To Know
To Kill a Mockingbird
Introduction
Summaries
Chapter 1
Chapters 2 - 3
Chapters 4 - 6
Chapters 7 - 8
Chapters 9 - 11
Chapters 12 - 13
Chapters 14 - 15
Chapters 16 - 17
Chapters 18 - 19
Chapters 20 - 22
Chapters 23 - 25
Chapters 26 - 27
Chapters 28 - 31
Characters
Interpretation
Themes
Motifs
Symbols
Style
Context

Chapters 18 - 19

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Summary Chapter 18

  • Mayella is the next to testify
    • she is 19 years old and seems to be terrified
    • the night when she was raped, she asked Tom Robinson to repair a dresser for her and when he was inside the house, he grabbed and raped her
    • Atticus makes Mayella reveal her poor life with seven siblings, her drunken father and no friends
  • Atticus asks her several sharp questions
    • why she didn't defend herself, why her siblings didn't notice what was happening, and how Tom was able to bruise the right side of her face when his left hand was crippled when he was a young boy
    • he finally pleads her to confess that Tom didn't rape her and that it was her father who beat her up
    • Mayella gets upset and exclaims that the jury would be cowards if they didn't convict Tom Robinson
    • shortly after, she starts crying and refuses to answer any more questions
  • Mr. Underwood notices that Jem and Scout are sitting in the balcony but Jem does not believe that he will tell their father

Summary Chapter 19

  • Tom recounts that Mayella has often asked him to help her with some chores when he passed their house
    • on said night, she asked her to fix a door but there was nothing wrong with it
    • there was no one else in the house because Mayella had given them money to buy ice cream according to Tom
    • Mayella tried to hug him and asked him to kiss her
    • Bob watched the scene through the window and called Mayella a whore, claiming that he would kill her
  • Tom's white employer - Link Deas - testifies that he has never had trouble with Tom throughout 8 years of work; the judge throws Deas out for this interruptive statement
  • the prosecutor Mr. Gilmer hints at the fact that Tom had been arrested once and Tom admits that he is capable of choking and slinging a person to the floor despite his crippled arm
  • Tom is pressed and asked about the reasons for always helping Mayella and he responds that he feels sorry for her
  • the people in the courtroom are shocked since a black person is not allowed to feel sorry for a white person
  • Mayella's testimony is reviewed by the prosecutor and he claims that Tom is lying
  • this causes Dill to burst into tears and Scout leaves the courtroom with him
  • Dill explains that he is upset about how rudely the prosecutor treated Tom
  • outside, they meet Mr. Dolphus Raymond

Function

  • Mayella is portrayed as some kind of mockingbird, too
    • her life is strained by ugliness, poverty and hatred
    • victimized: father abuses and most likely molests her, has to raise her siblings
    • never experienced any love or respect, doesn't recognize it as kindness when Atticus calls her Miss but thinks that he is making fun of her
    • has no friends and is considered to be the loneliest person in the world by Scout
    • has ambiguous roles for Scout: victim due to her upbringing but also responsible for Tom being ruined in order to deflect negative attention away from her
  • Tom is characterized as purely honest and good
    • works hard and is compassionate enough to feel sorry for Mayella
    • reader believes his story over Mayella's due to his honest nature and Atticus's destructive questioning of the Ewells
    • although it is quite clear that Tom is innocent, it is also obvious that he will die
  • Link Deas functions as the opposite of prejudice
    • doesn't care about the skin color of Tom; only a person's character matters to him
    • court refuses to assess Atticus's evidence as well as Deas's validation of Tom's character
    • his statement destroys the integrity of the formal processes of a court - which is ironic, since the whole trial is based on prejudice and can by no means considered as moral
  • Mr. Gilmer as purely racist
    • calls Tom "boy" and constantly accuses him
    • according to Mr. Gilmer, Tom must be lying, violent and desiring white women just because he is black
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